Students of Color Oral History Project

Several racist and anti-Muslim events took place at Millersville University following President Trump’s election in November, 2016. In a case that received national attention, two white students in blackface shared their photo through Snapchat. In another, a Muslim student had her hijab pulled off by a group of young white men on campus.

The Students of Color Oral History Project explored the campus environment for students of color at Millersville University during the academic year 2017 – 2018

Standing 4 Kaepernick Protest - Philadelphia
Standing 4 Kaepernick Protest – Philadelphia

To browse the exhibit, click here:
Students of Color Oral History Project

Millersville’s Past: Women Who Made a Difference

A collection of the incredible women of Millersville University’s past and their accomplishments.

Adapted from original brochure by Alex Slick (’19)

Student Researchers for original brochure: Jerrod Mertz, Susan Sentz, Ben Charles, students from History 250.

Millersville's Past: Women Who Made a Difference Brochure
Millersville’s Past: Women Who Made a Difference Brochure

To browse the exhibit, click here:
Millersville’s Past: Women Who Made a Difference

APSCUF Strike (2016)

To capture the strike-related experiences of Millersville University faculty, staff, and students; Archives & Special Collections in McNairy Library began an oral history project during fall semester, 2016, that continued into spring semester, 2017.  The student volunteer members of the faculty strike project team, and the student employees in McNairy Library’s Archives & Special Collections areas, participated in a collaborative effort alongside Library faculty members over the course of a year and a half. The project team consisted of seven Millersville University undergraduate and graduate students and five Library faculty members. Volunteer university students included: Alex Arnold, Lauren Cameron, Abigail Gruber, Hunter Mengel, Victoria Mueller, Taylor Payne, and Kyle Thomas. The volunteer faculty members included: Katie Barrett, Libby Nelson, Tatiana Pashkova-Balkenhol, Stephanie Pennucci, and Marilyn Parrish.

Student Supporters (2016)
Student Supporters (2016)

To browse the exhibit, click here:
APSCUF Strike (2016)

Harlem Renaissance, 1917-1935

Harlem, New York, a large neighborhood in the northern section of New York City Borough of Manhattan, has been known as a major African-American residential, cultural and business center since the 1920s.  The influx of African-Americans into Harlem began with The Great Migration when 5 million southern Blacks moved north and west between 1915 and 1960.  The first large movement occurred during World War I when 454,000 Black southerners moved north to Chicago, Detroit, Pittsburgh and New York.

The Harlem Renaissance was originally known as the “New Negro Experience” named after the 1925 anthology The New Negro: An Interpretation, edited by Alain Loccke.

Fire by Zora Neal Hurston
Fire by Zora Neal Hurston

To browse the exhibit, click here:
Harlem Renaissance