Site-Wide Activity

  • Janet Kacskos wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month ago

    Spring ‘24 Environmental Workshops at the ‘Ville The spring semester is bringing more opportunities for environmental education through Millersville’s Watershed Training Institute. Workshops are being offered in January and March. The Project WET Climate, Water, and Resilience Educator Workshop will be held virtually on Zoom on Jan. 23 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. This workshop is designed to provide tools for educators to teach middle and high school students about climate change and sustainability. Instruction will be provided for interactive, science-based activities that are student-centered. This event is open to all educators teaching students in grades 6-12. This event is free, and participants are asked to sign up here. Participants will receive a download code for Project WET’s “Climate, Water, and Resilience Educator Guide,” as well as free one-month access to Project WET’s WELL Portal for Educators. This portal provides digital teaching tools like interactive e-books, eLessons and videos. This workshop can be applied to two Act 48 hours. The Project WET Educator Workshop will be held on March 16 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the WETi on Millersville’s campus. This workshop offers education on water and is fit for Common Core Standards and applicable to grades K-12. Activities in this workshop provide teaching methods, assessment strategies and essential tools necessary to integrate water education into all school subjects. This workshop will not have the climate focus of the preceding virtual event. This event is free and participants are asked to register here. There are 30 spots available. WETi workshops provide unique opportunities for professional development. “These workshops provide teachers with a hands-on experience that is not necessarily found in other workshops and professional development days,” says Liz Rickrode, a graduate assistant for Educational Foundations professor Dr. Nanette Marcum-Dietrich. WETi events often include outdoor experiences with the intent of encouraging teachers to consider the value of outdoor education. “This outdoor experience can then be brought to the classroom and use […] “Spring ‘24 Environmental Workshops at the ‘Ville”

  • Calling All Poets-Academy of American Poets Student Poetry ContestThe Academy of American Poets is hosting a student poetry contest and we invite both undergraduate and graduate students to apply! You […]

  • Calling All Poets!- Academy of American Poets Student Poetry ContestThe Academy of American Poets is hosting a student poetry contest and we invite both undergraduate and graduate students to […]

  • Janet Kacskos wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month ago

    Grant Addresses Food Insecurity on Campus Millersville University is the recipient of a $40,000 Hunger-Free Campus Grant, as one of 30 institutions to receive support from the Pennsylvania Department of Education. These grants, originating under the Wolf Administration and continued by the Shapiro Administration, are awarded to help schools address food insecurity on campus and create initiatives to expand awareness of the issue. With the 2022-23 grant, the University was able to renovate space at the HUB, which allowed it to expand its kitchen, the Campus Cupboard, and the facilities’ restrooms for ADA compliance. The HUB provides four hot meals each week for free, along with free grab-and-go breakfast items and snacks daily. The Campus Cupboard allows students to “shop” for grocery items once a week at no charge, including fresh food and even personal hygiene items. To build off the progress made by last year’s grant, part of the funds this year will be used to create a “Sub-HUB Station” in the Student Memorial Center. Currently, unopened food items are collected in boxes by the Food Recovery Network near the Galley and the Anchor and then delivered to the HUB. The Sub-HUB Station would provide a more prominent space with refrigeration and shelving, so more students are aware of the resource. Additionally, the funding will be used to further expand the HUB’s outreach. Dr. Mary Beth Williams, vice president for student affairs, explains that more students are utilizing the HUB now. “The HUB currently serves around 350 students per week, and the student use of the Campus Cupboard continues to rise,” she says. “With this grant, MU will provide funding to The HUB for expanded meal programming and funding for increased advertisement about HUB services throughout campus.” She continues, “Having a wonderful community partner like The HUB is essential to serving our food insecure students, and finding ways to communicate with students about the resources is vital to that success.” A third goal is to use the grant to provide students with hot meals and distribution of food items during the holiday break. “Many students, primarily our international students, LGBTQ+ students and students who were raised in the foster care system, do not have another place to go during the break when the campus dining facilities are not regularly open,” says Williams. “These weekly meals and food distribution points would allow students who stay on campus to be fed, take food with them, and connect with faculty, staff and students on the Hunger Free Campus Task Force who want to support and help them during the long break,” she continues. “During the meal, there will be fun programming for these students that will help them build trust with the faculty, staff and students on the Hunger Free Task Force. At the end of the meal, fresh and non-perishable food will be distributed to each student.” Ultimately, these initiatives are another way to showcase the University’s commitment to its EPPIIC Values. “At its heart, this grant proposal is about sharing,” says Williams. “Students want to share food they have with other students in need, and Millersville faculty, staff and the HUB all want to support students in any way they can. Together, with this funding, our community can come together and help feed students in need.” All grant recipients are members of the Hunger-Free Campus Initiative, a coalition of Pennsylvania institutions of higher education focused on addressing hunger and other basic needs for their students, creating opportunities for connection among student hunger advocates, providing resources and strategies for campuses, and supporting opportunities to apply for grants related to addressing food insecurity. You can see all of the 2023-2024 PA Hu​​nger-Free Campus Grant Awa […] “Grant Addresses Food Insecurity on Campus”

  • kmadas wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month, 1 week ago

    Why I Give: Dr. Dennis Denenberg There are two topics that almost always surface when speaking with Dr. Dennis Denenberg: his passion for breast health and his gardens. Both topics stem from his love of heroes. Denenberg, who had a long career in education, including as a professor at Millersville, spent almost 20 years as a nationally known speaker, talking about real-life heroes and their importance to kids and adults. Two of his real-life heroes include his sister, Diana Denenberg Durand, who graciously fought a battle with breast cancer for 18 years, and former U.S. President Thomas Jefferson. Diana was the impetus for Dennis to start the Breast Cancer Awareness Program at Millersville University through an endowment. The program includes “Breast-A-Ville,” an annual event to educate students of the importance of breast health and breast cancer awareness and prevention. It also includes the Diana Denenberg Durand Spirit Garden and Statue, located at the University’s Stayer Hall, which was dedicated in 2007 in honor of Diana. And “Diana’s Dreamers: Determined to Defeat Breast Cancer” is an endowment set up through the Millersville University Foundation to raise awareness among young women and men about breast cancer and breast health. In 2016, Denenberg received the “Honorary Alumni Award” from the University’s Alumni Association. In honoring him, they said, “Dr. Denenberg has earned the title of a hero in influencing hundreds or maybe thousands of Millersville education students over his 15-year tenure (1987-2002) as a professor in the School of Education. Many of these students have benefited from the groundbreaking ‘Hooray for Heroes’ program he initiated while at Millersville.” “Everyone needs a hero, someone to look up to. There are heroes all around us, in our communities and throughout history,” says Denenberg. One of his Millersville students, Lynette Leaman Brenneman ’97, went on to become a teacher and recently spoke about Denenberg’s impact on her. “Dr. Denenberg taught us how he wanted us to teach our own students,” says Brenneman. “I still remember one day he came to class wearing a historical hat. More than almost any other professor, Dr. Denenberg influenced me in how I taught day to day during the 12 years I taught in my third-grade classroom. I focused on the heroes of Lancaster when I taught my Lancaster County unit in third grade.” The Hilda and David Denenberg Student Lounge in Millersville University’s Stayer Education Building was established by Denenberg to honor his mom and dad, “who kept their vow never to say an unkind word to one another in front of their children.” The lounge features memorabilia from the Denenberg family history. Dennis Denenberg is now at the stage in his life where he is deciding who he wants his belongings to go to. One of the reasons Thomas Jefferson was a hero to him is because he loved to garden. Denenberg has an acre of gardens that he lovingly devotes to flowers and special features. Denenberg has put in his will that the acre of gardens and his house will be given to the Millersville University Foundation. The Foundation is a separate entity from the University, and its mission is to manage and invest endowed gifts for the University. Many visitors consider the all-pink garden dedicated to breast cancer survivors to be their favorite spot. The sign, designed by Matt Patek, displays a quote from the song entitled “Fighter” by Millersville alumna Liz Fulmer. “You won’t ever see her giving up ’cause she is a fighter” was written to honor Diana. Of course, the Gardens of Oz showcase the owner’s love of “The Wizard of Oz.” There’s the yellow brick road leading to Emerald City and Toto’s dressing room – you can peer in through the roof to see what the movie star has in his personal canine collection. There are many other features: two ponds, the Mardi Gras tree, “Mama” Jade (65 years old) and her family, the shade sails over the hosta bed, the succulent tree and huge beds devoted to particular types of flowers. In addition to his house and gardens, Denenberg’s extensive collection of childhood toys will go to The Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, New York. His massive collection of things from “The Wizard of Oz” will go to the Schreiber Center for Pediatric Development, which helped him with a speech impediment decades ago. Sitting in the midst of his hundreds of flowers, Denenberg, who is now fully recovered from a stroke two years ago, says, “I was blessed with two incredible parents, an amazing sister and a wonderful life. I want to continue to honor Diana and my family through perpetuity, and donating my treasures is one way I can do that. Life […] “Why I Give: Dr. Dennis Denenberg”

  • Janet Kacskos wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month, 1 week ago

    Chef’s Table Continues at the ‘Ville Millersville Dining is giving students the opportunity to learn from and be heard by the staff through an event called Chef’s Table. The event allows Millersville students to have an intimate dining and learning experience with executive chef John Johnson. Students are served a three-course meal prepared by Johnson while participating in a discussion about Millersville dining, nutrition and food. The event is held at the Upper Deck on the last Wednesday of every month during the spring and fall semesters. Before the event, students who eat at the Upper Deck can fill out a ticket to be entered into a raffle to secure a spot. Students must have a meal plan to enter. Winners are invited to bring a guest of their choosing. The deadline to enter January’s drawing is Jan. 19, with the dinner on Jan. 31. Another drawing will be held in February. The event is intended to be a learning experience for attendees. Johnson focuses on food pairings to introduce students to new ways of enjoying the Upper Deck. “I’ll take what’s on the menu that night and cook it and pair it the way I would do it and let [students] see how it looks,” says Johnson. “I try to look at nutrition and fun and how I can mix and match.” The goal is to enlighten students about what the dining staff do, how and why they do it and how the different foods offered can be utilized. Chef’s Table is also designed to serve as a way for dining staff and students to connect, and Johnson often invites a member of his staff or the executive offices to join in. The event allows students to voice their concerns about dining directly to staff members rather than sending an email or talking to an administrative assistant. “I want students to know that they’re being constructively heard and listened to,” says Johnson. “They actually get to sit down with me and learn who I am, learn about me, have good conversations about dining and know that I’m listening.” The Chef’s Table dinners for the spring semester will be held Jan. 31, Feb. 28, March 27 and April 24. All dinners will begin at 5 p.m. Click here for more information about Millersville dining. […] “Chef’s Table Continues at the ‘Ville”

  • The Tell School of Music is proud to again offer the popular "Career-Ready in Music Education” on March 14, 2024, from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM The Tell School of Music is proud to again offer the popular “Career-Ready in Music Education” on March 14, 2024, from 9:00 AM to 4 […]

  • We invite you to join us on March 28th, 2024 for a full day of panel discussions, workshops, and more! We invite you to join us on March 28th, 2024 for a full day of panel discussions, workshops, and more! You will have th […]

  • Janet Kacskos wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month, 1 week ago

    ‘Ville Professor Wins Counselor Educator of the Year Millersville Associate Professor of Psychology Dr. Richard Joseph “Joe” Behun was awarded Counselor Educator of the Year for 2023 by the Pennsylvania School Counselors Association. Nominated by a former student, Behun was chosen for the award among over 50 other Pennsylvania school counselor educators. “I feel very honored and humbled to have won,” says Behun. An awards ceremony was held on Dec. 7. The Pennsylvania School Counselors Association recognizes winners for several categories relevant to school counseling every academic year. The association aims to educate and empower PA-based school counselors through professional development, support of programs and providing a voice to professional school counselors. Behun didn’t start out working toward the school counseling profession, nor was he expecting to end up there when he first began his higher education. During his undergraduate years at California University of Pennsylvania, he studied political science and criminal justice with the intent of attending law school afterward. During his senior year, he volunteered to be a peer mentor for a first-year student, which changed the trajectory of his professional endeavors. “I was already accepted to law school, and I woke up on a Saturday morning and I just thought to myself, ‘I think that I’d see more life satisfaction out of working as a school counselor,’” says Behun. Behun says the school counseling profession has long been largely misunderstood, previously thought of as strictly an academic resource for students. On the contrary, school counselors are responsible for much more, including managing the mental health of students. Professional school counselors are educated in therapy practices in order to appropriately handle issues that students may have. “There is no better person in the school system to deal with student mental health than the school counselor,” says Behun. As an ever-evolving profession, school counselors are facing and adapting to new challenges constantly. Notable adaptations have been alongside the ongoing change in schools due to COVID-19. While schools were closed, school counselors faced issues with having to navigate their profession digitally. “No one knew what Zoom was, and we certainly wouldn’t ever counsel someone over the phone or through a computer,” says Behun, regarding counseling prior to the pandemic. Nonverbal communication accounts for a large portion of what someone is saying, making counseling difficult through a call. As issues like poor mental health continue to rise in schools, education and training of future counselors are also adapting to appropriately handle future matters. Behun believes himself to be a counselor first, and educator second in terms of his profession. He encourages his students to ponder this themselves. “I ask my students in the very beginning to think about when they’re organizing their own philosophy— Are they a counselor who educates or an […] “‘Ville Professor Wins Counselor Educator of the Year”

  • Janet Kacskos wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month, 1 week ago

    Free Flights Transport Patients For Life Saving Treatments When Millersville University alum, Jessica Ames ’13 graduated she knew she wanted to work for a smaller grassroots nonprofit. Searching on Craigslist, she found a part-time listing at Angel Flight East becoming their first programs and events coordinator. Initially, she saw the opportunity as a stepping stone for a career change, but nine years later, Ames is now the outreach and events director and is taking flying lessons with ambitions of one day providing flights to patients in need. Ames credits Dr. Jennifer Wood for teaching her everything she needed to know as her advisor. “As a public relations major, I had the opportunity to be an intern with various nonprofit organizations and that’s how I discovered that is where I wanted my career path to take me.” Angel Flight East was founded in Pennsylvania by Harry Morales, a general aviation pilot, who wanted to help with relief efforts after Hurricane Andrew in 1992. He created AFE with the help of Jeff Kahn and Joe Staples, among others. Their vision and commitment to the “principles of public benefit flying” drove the dynamic force of what was to become AFE. Immediately, the organization began to fill the gap between the need to access crucial medical care at a distance and the high cost of transportation to get there. “We fly many patients for cancer care, rare disease treatments, clinical trials, etc.,” says Ames. AFE provides free flights for patients in need of medical treatment far from home. Volunteer pilots use their own airplanes and cover all costs of the flight. AFE covers a 14-state footprint that spans from Virginia to Ohio to Maine and for destinations outside that territory, they partner with other volunteer pilot organizations. AFE schedules close to 1,000 flights per year. Flight range is a minimum of 100 miles and a maximum of 1,000 miles. In addition to providing flights for patients, AFE also delivers supplies to disaster areas and helps reunite families during desperate times. To volunteer or find out more information about Angel Flight East […] “Free Flights Transport Patients For Life Saving Treatments”

  • Celebrating MLK To celebrate the legacy […] “”

  • Lightbox Therapy for the Winter Months The start of a new semester, adjusting after the holiday season, colder weather and shorter days are all contributing factors to why some students find this time of year to be more difficult than others. The Counseling Center at Millersville University offers a wide range of services to help its students through difficulties, including the use of lightbox therapy. Lightbox therapy is one way to combat Seasonal Affective Disorder, a type of depression that comes and goes with the winter months. Dr. Lisa House, psychologist and professor at the University, is the director of the lightbox therapy program. She explains that while major depressive disorder is felt year-round, the symptoms of SAD can begin in the fall months and are resolved around spring or summer. The lightboxes are used to mimic sunlight, which can help boost a student’s mood while they read or complete their schoolwork. “Light therapy is a common treatment for seasonal affective disorder, regularizing the patient’s circadian rhythm and balancing melatonin and serotonin,” House explains. “When melatonin and serotonin levels are unbalanced, they can negatively impact sleep behaviors and mood.” House adds, “One benefit of light therapy is that it’s quick-acting and symptoms improve significantly after two weeks. In addition, it’s cost-effective, which benefits colleges as mental health resource demand is increasing. It is also a natural approach and research has found it to be as effective as medication.” While the “winter blues” is something that many students might feel they struggle with, they may not know they can use the resources at the Counseling Center to counteract those feelings. “SAD can profoundly impact an individual’s ability to perform simple daily tasks and often leads to low motivation, impaired concentration, fatigue, irritability, sleep difficulties, sadness and apathy,” explains House. “This can impact academics and students often find themselves less energetic, less motivated and not able to concentrate. Work piles up and students are very overwhelmed. Difficulty waking, low energy, low concentration, anxiety, weight gain and decreased socializing are other symptoms that can interfere with functioning.” House explains that students should pay close attention if they notice these traits in themselves. Additionally, if students feel sadness or hopelessness, have angry outbursts, irritability, loss of interest or pleasure in most normal daily activities, sleep changes, appetite changes, feel worthless and have unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches, aches, nearly every day, they should go to a doctor for assessment. Students interested in the lightbox services can call the Counseling Center at 717-871-7821, or they can email Dr. House with any questions they may have. The Center also offers individual counseling sessions to all students at Millersville University, virtually and in person. They can also provide recommendations for personal lightboxes for students who benefit from the service and would like to use it more frequently. For more information about counseling services at Millersville Universi […] “Lightbox Therapy for the Winter Months”

  • kmadas wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month, 2 weeks ago

    The Inspirational Journey of a Scientist & University First Lady When Dr. Judith Wubah arrived in 2018 as first lady of Millersville University, one of the first things she realized was that the role of a first lady does not have a job description. After working as a faculty member and administrator in higher education, she had a mindset that the first thing you need to know about a job is what is required of you. “The first year was challenging,” says Judith, “because PASSHE regulations do not allow presidential spouses to work at the same institution. I had to figure out what to do. I can tell you it is a difficult but fulfilling job. I travel with the president to numerous events on and off campus and act as an ambassador for the University at all times. That first year, we traveled to Arizona, California, Florida, Massachusetts, Texas and China to meet with alums. I take care of professional and personal matters so Daniel does not have to worry and can focus on his role as president.” Judith was born in Winneba, in the Central Region of Ghana and met Daniel in 1980 at the University of Cape Coast. “It was not love at first sight. He talked too much,” says Judith. “He sat in front of me in class, and I knocked him on the head during class because he was so talkative.” During the Wubahs’ time at UCC, there were constant political upheavals in Ghana. In 1983, while preparing for their final comprehensive exams, students at all three universities demonstrated against the government. In retaliation, the universities were closed, and students were sent home for 10 months. “When we came back for our final exams in March 1984, Daniel and I formed a study group with our cohort for botany. At our first meeting, I began to see Daniel’s leadership skills based on how he structured the group. At our next meeting, it was obvious that the student scheduled to present had not prepared. We had been given only two months to prepare for exams, so there was no time to lose. That is when Daniel and I decided to meet on our own to study. We were both middle-class kids and more studious than some – and I had the smarts! Daniel was meticulous in his preparations and studying skills, an attribute I liked about him. We were studious, to the point that we could answer every question on the final exams and crushed it! We graduated at the top of our class.” Daniel left for the U.S. in August 1984 to pursue his master’s degree in biology at the University of Akron in Ohio. Judith followed in August 1985, where they worked with the same professor, Dr. Don Ott. She received her master’s degree in biology in 1989. They were married in 1993 in Baltimore. “Our wedding in the U.S. was at the courthouse with my sister-in-law and a family friend as witnesses,” says Judith. “We returned home to Ghana for a full-blown wedding – which was for our parents – the following year. My parents were the ultimate event planners, as this wedding was for their only daughter! I can tell you that my mother had a blast! To this day, I celebrate our first wedding date, and Daniel celebrates our second wedding date.” As the daughter of an Anglican bishop, Judith is a lifelong Episcopalian. Therefore, faith is important to her, and she believes in angels. “Angels have played a large part in my life,” she says. “One angel, Jessie Pervall, saved a spot for me in the Ph.D. program at Thomas Jefferson University when I had to delay acceptance for a year to become a legal U.S. resident.” “The program is designed to train molecular scientists to undertake research in how humans are formed from conception to birth and what cellular or metabolic pathways are disrupted, leading to birth defects,” says Judith. “It’s mind-boggling how many processes can go wrong during pregnancy, but most of the time, we end up with a healthy human.” She then started a two-year postdoctoral program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Working in the lab of Dr. Chuck Bieberich, whom Judith calls another one of her angels, she studied the molecular aspects of prostate development and prostate cancer. In the second year of her postdoc, the Wubahs moved to James Madison University. The Wubahs continued to move as Daniel climbed the academic administrative ladder.  “I was a faculty member at JMU and later at the University of Florida Medical School. I loved working with students in the lab,” says Judith.   From Florida, the couple moved to Virginia Tech, and Judith became the founding director of the Office of Health Professions Advising. The office focused on advising and preparing students interested in health-related careers. “We arranged mock interviews on campus, where I got retired VT professors and local health professionals to serve on panels. It was the most rewarding job I have ever had.” Fast-forward to 2013, when Daniel became provost, and the family moved to Washington and Lee University in Virginia. At W&L, Judith was appointed the Associate Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations, responsible for the management of externally funded grants. While at W&L, Daniel became a tribal king (Toapentenhene) at Breman Asikuma in the Central Region of Ghana. “I never knew he was going to be king,” says Judith. “I had some inkling of his royal lineage, but his mother was initially against his ascending to the throne. When his uncle died, the throne passed on to Daniel. My other title, therefore, is Nanayere (literal translation: “the king’s wife”), where my role is similar to first lady responsibilities, ensuring that everything is carried out as needed in order for Daniel to perform his duties as the king. I also have the responsibility of leading the women in the tribe, and so we have set up a microfinance program for them.” Judith says they both consider the U.S. as home. “We’ve lived here longer than our birthplace of Ghana. Both daughters and our two grandchildre […] “The Inspirational Journey of a Scientist & University First Lady”

  • kmadas wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month, 2 weeks ago

    STEM Partnerships Provide Hands-On Experience One of the best ways for students to learn more about their field of interest is through real-world, hands-on experiences. Thanks to corporate partnerships, Millersville University STEM students now have access to even more opportunities to grow and learn. Last spring, the University announced its partnership with Lampire Biological Laboratories, an international biotech life science firm that creates and supplies biological reagents for the diagnostic and pharmaceutical industries. In addition to providing MU’s biology, chemistry and biochemistry faculty with opportunities for educational programming, two students were selected as interns to help with Lampire’s work. Danielle Nietupski, a junior biology major with a concentration in molecular biology, and Sarah Abrahem, a junior biology major were the two students selected as Lampire interns. Nietupski was interested in the opportunity after a campus visit from Lampire. “I found out about this internship by attending a colloquium where Lampire shared what their company was about as well as their new partnership with the University. There was an application process, which consisted of an interview and then a walkthrough of the lab space.” Much of her work with Lampire involves performing ELISA tests, a laboratory technique that detects and counts different antibodies, antigens, proteins and hormones in bodily fluid samples. “As an intern, I run ELISA tests on different samples, sometimes testing the reactivity of antigen to an antibody, or looking to see if an antibody can neutralize its target.” Additionally, Nietupski works closely with Lampire’s Dr. Donna Cartledge-Wolf as they conduct neutralizing tests with infectious particles like influenza and HSV-1. “We will also be creating a DNA vector that expresses a green fluorescent protein in mammalian cells for an upcoming project.” Nietupski says her work with Lampire varies day to day, and combined with her previous courses at Millersville, she’s learning a lot about her field. “Taking cell biology has helped me in understanding how different biological components interact with each other. For example, when moving cells to another flask, an enzyme must be added to release the cells by cleaving proteins that hold the cells to the flask and to each other. “The most rewarding aspect of the internship is getting to see into the biotechnology industry,” Nietupski says. “Not only have I learned a lot about different techniques and procedures from Dr. Cartledge-Wolf, but I have also seen how different experiments are translated into services for clients of Lampire.” Nietupski adds, “I am very grateful for this opportunity; I am excited to be a part of this partnership with Lampire and Millersville. I have learned a lot so far from Dr. Cartledge-Wolf, and I am excited to continue gaining knowledge about the biotechnology industry.” Dr. Marc Harris, dean of the College of Science and Technology, adds that these kinds of partnerships align with the core mission of the College. “The SCTE educational promise is to provide all students with the depth and breadth of education and the hands-on learning needed for success in contemporary fields of science and technology,” he says. Harris concludes, “Industry partnerships, like with Lampire, will enhance our abilities to conduct cutting-edge research with students, leading to phenomenal student learning outcomes for students […] “STEM Partnerships Provide Hands-On Experience”

  • kmadas wrote a new post on the site Millersville News 1 month, 2 weeks ago

    The Winding Road to Finding Your Path College is an important time of self-discovery. Some students know right from the get-go what they want to study and who they want to be: a nurse, a teacher, or maybe even a meteorologist. For others, the road is a bit more winding. Here, Millersville alumni share how they started out on our campus and where they ultimately ended up in their professional careers. From getting a degree in anthropology to becoming a candlemaker or going from therapist to owning a business, it’s been quite a journey for this group of grads. JORDAN EVANGELISTA ’13, ’15M: I received my undergraduate degree in psychology in 2013 and a master’s degree in clinical psychology in 2015. Since then, my career path has taken many twists and turns. I started out utilizing my degree as a mental health therapist. Although I was putting my degree to good use, I felt drawn to the higher education world, which I was exposed to during my graduate assistant position in the registrar’s office at Millersville. I eventually made the transition to higher education and started working at Lebanon Valley College. Several years later, life took another turn. My husband and I started a family in March of 2019 and decided to start a business soon after in order to provide more flexibility and possibilities for our daughter. We are now the proud owners of HQ Water Solutions, a water treatment company in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. I left the higher education world and joined the business full-time in 2023, and we just reached $1 million in sales. We now have two daughters, business is booming, and we live a life full of purpose and joy. Although it wasn’t the path I envisioned, it’s a path I am beyond grateful for. It’s a path that wouldn’t have been possible without my education at Millersville University. BECKY FUNK ‘99, ‘04M: I graduated with my bachelor’s degree in math education in 1999 and earned my master’s in math education in 2004.  I had wanted to be a teacher all my life and loved every minute of working with the students at my first job at a local high school. From there I taught for several years at a local college. I quit my teaching job to stay home and focus on my own boys but knew I wanted to get back into the workforce when they were older. When that time came, I wanted a career that gave me flexibility while allowing me to work with teens. A friend of mine suggested life coaching. I never saw myself owning my own business, but being a certified confidence coach allows me to do what I truly love: helping teen girls and young women love who they see when they look in the mirror. The educational and psychological components of my degrees still help me in this new career path. CATHERINE HOGUE ‘13: When I first became a Marauder, I had high hopes of being a high school English teacher. However, two years into my college education, I realized that teaching was not the right path for me, so I dropped the education portion of my degree and completed my B.A. in English, thinking I would go the reporting and journalism route. While I did a bit of reporting for some local newspapers during college and after graduation, I fell into a digital and social media marketing role with a professional sports team in Charlotte, North Carolina. It turned out to be a slippery slope because I have stuck with that career, going from professional sports to a small family business and now, into higher education, serving as the digital ad and social media content creator at Lancaster Bible College SANDIE KRAMER ’89: As a freshman, I entered MU as an early education major and quickly learned that being a teacher was not for me, but I did enjoy reading and writing. I majored in speech communications with a minor in public relations. I graduated and was offered a job at a local Bucks County radio station, making $5 an hour. As much fun as that was, I could make $9 an hour as a temp at a pharmaceutical company in their accounts payable department. I did not want to work in finance the rest of my life – my degree was in communications, so I went on and worked to get my master’s in instructional design (adult education), which felt kind of full circle. Then life got in the way; I had two kids and became a stay-at-home mom. One day my husband spoke with our tax accountant, and she explained that she was opening her own business and was looking to hire someone. My husband said, “Sandie is looking for a job!” and the rest is history. I have been a tax accountant for 20 years now at the same company and have loved every minute of it. JORDAN KUHNS ’12: It took radical acceptance to understand that my dream job spiraled into a nightmare. I spent my undergraduate years at Millersville preparing for a career in the sports broadcasting field. All told, I spent 10 years in the industry. The lifestyle became increasingly unstable and unsustainable the more time I devoted to the craft. I had to adapt and change my goals. I spent a few months after the dust settled charting my new course. I chose to serve as a multimedia professional for a behavioral school. I knew I possessed the qualifications to take this position and run with it. One year into this life change has proven that my decision was the right one. TYLER LONGENECKER ’11: I’m a 2011 Millersville graduate with a degree in secondary education (social studies & economics). I was initially drawn to connecting with struggling students and fostering interactive learning, and Millersville empowered me to teach various social studies subjects to diverse age groups. The relationships and support from several Millersville professors challenged me to lead with energy and passion. Eventually transitioning to the sales industry, I found similarities between teaching and selling, adapting to different products and audiences. Millersville underscored the significance of interpersonal connections in my career, and my time on campus proved to be an enormous building block for the career I didn’t know I would follow. With several promotions, I discovered my passion and now serve as a sales leader in an infection prevention company prioritizing healthcare safety. I’ve been mentored, mentored others, and now lead a national sales team for a community-oriented organization. MISSY MCKELVEY ’93: After getting married and moving to Philadelphia, I knew I did not want to teach. I was hired for customer service. With my degree in math, they put me in charge of accounting items such as credit memos and chargeback clearing. This led to my getting an MBA in accounting from La Salle University. I took time off to have kids and moved to Reading, Pennsylvania. I went back to work as a staff accountant with Brentwood Industries. They were converting their system and found themselves in need of a financial person who understood the computer side as well. I transitioned into an IT role, where I learned the backside of a software package used to track and plan resources called Enterprise Resource Planning. I now work as a consultant implementing and training on the SyteLine ERP system. It uses both the teaching side and the logic side from my original degree in secondary mathematics education. ADAM MENTZER ’05, ’09M: I obtained my license in social work in 2013 and worked as a school social worker for a private school until the pandemic shutdown of Pennsylvania schools in March 2020. In August 2020, I started my own handyman business, and in April 2021, I made it an official LLC. I now have a crew of eight, and we serve three counties as Adam’s Handyman and Contracting. I absolutely love the change from social work to home improvement contractor. I am able to better provide for my family, and having a crew of skilled workers in their respective fields allows me more time off than a social worker would have. ANDREW NEWELL ’12: After graduating from Millersville in 2012 with a computer science degree, I briefly ventured into website design and Android app development. However, when I relocated to Richmond, Virginia, in 2013 with just $50, necessity led me to thrifting. Balancing retail jobs, I reinvested my earnings from reselling thrifted items. By 2015, I committed full-time to this enterprise, later diversifying into selling unclaimed mail. My passion project “Smalls” emerged in 2021 as a retail store echoing Millersville’s black-and-gold color scheme. Today, in 2023, we flourish in a 10,000-sq.-ft. space. My Millersville education was pivotal in my ability to adapt and seize diverse opportunities. Moreover, my store, while a hub for unique finds, also showcases my love for nature photography, particularly from my national park explorations. Every photo sold supports the National Park Foundation. From computer science to “Smalls,” my journey epitomizes the versatility a Millersville education offers. HARMONY TODD ’12: I graduated from Millersville University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in anthropology with a focus on archaeology. I went on to graduate school at Arcadia University, where I received my master’s in international peace and conflict resolution in 2014. It was that summer after I finished college that I began exploring old hobbies, including candlemaking. What started as a hobby grew into a small business and a table at the Trenton Farmers Market in New Jersey. My plan to continue on with my doctorate in international relations was completely blindsided by all the fun I was having while challenging myself to learn business and marketing skills. My company, Old Soul Artisan, eventually grew into a thriving candle business, where I now spend my days developing candle fragrances inspired by literature, folklore and fairy tales. Entrepreneurship is challenging, but the artistic freedom it allows me is worth all the hard work. NELLY VELEZ ’13: I am forever #MUPROUD. I graduated in May 2013 with a bachelor’s in English education. I was unable to find a local teaching position that year but was blessed with the opportunity to work for a foster care agency while studying finance in the evenings and getting licensed for financial services. I became very curious about how my 401k and investments worked, since I never had the opportunity to take a financial course. I met my husband in 2015, and together, we opened up our own financial branch with over 65 licensed agents who we mentor and work alongside each and every day. We’ve helped the families we serve become debt-free, invest for retirement, get preapproved for mortgages as well as become properly protected to be able to leave a legacy for […] “The Winding Road to Finding Your Path”

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